Reusing a Virgin Media Superhub 3 as a Wifi Extender

Or an ethernet hub

Despite the Superhub’s remaining property of Virgin Media, when I asked about the return on the Superhub, they advised that the hub didn’t need to be sent back, most likely because they have moved into the Superhub4, and that the old hub can be disposed of.

This seems quite wasteful, since the hub works perfectly. I’m not a fan of disposing electronics needlessly if its in working order. Besides if you need an extra few ethernet ports, why not reuse the equipment you already have?

Starting from Scratch

Probably best to reset the hub back to its factory state. This can be done by holding the reset button down for 10-12 seconds, then waiting for the router to restart

Configuration

Enter 192.168.0.1 into the browser address bar to access the superhub configuration page, you will need to enter the settings password, which can be found on the underside of the superhub.

Before we make any major changes, we can configure the basic settings using the interface. Use this to change any settings relation to the Wifi configuration, as it will be harder to change later.

Disabling DHCP

Since you will be using the superhub on a network that already has a DHCP server, you will need to disable the DHCP on the superhub, since your main router will perform the DHCP duties.

What is DHCP? It is responsible for issuing and maintain the IP address on your network, which ties into NAT (Network address translation). You only need one on your network, having multiple DHCP servers is unnecessary unless you have an enterprise network. Also not to be confused with HDCP

After this you will lose network connectivity with the router, this is because the super hub is no longer assigning IP address. To restore you will need to switch to a static IP temporarily whilst we configure the router. In Kubunu you can configure this in the connections panel in the system settings. For Windows there are various tutorials on how to configure a static IP.

Remember to use 192.168.0.1 for the default gateway, as for the client IP address, you can use 192.168.0.2, You might need to login to the router interface again.

Changing the gateway IP (optional)

You might not need to do this, depending on the IP configuration of your network. By default the super hub uses the address 192.168.0.1 as long as you don’t have any other devices using this address then you should be fine, but you should check first regardless.

Unfortunately with the superhub 3, if you change the default IP address to anything other than 192.168.0.1, the configuration page is no longer accessible. the router will still function as a switch or hub but you will no longer be able to edit any settings or access the configuration page. therefore before you do this, ensure the superhub is configured as you prefer as you will be unable to modify them later, unless you perform factory reset.

This also means that if you have two superhub 3’s, then you will need to do this on one of the superhubs to stop one from interfering with the others, since its a bad idea two have two devices using the same IP address, especially if one is a router/gateway.

Normally you cannot change this via the default interface. We can work around this by entering commands via the address bar as outlined below.

First, enable the developer window in your browser by pressing F12

For Chrome based browsers, Click Console, then enable LogXWLHttpRequests

For Mozilla based browsers, this should be enabled by default

Refresh the router page and inspect the console log

We need to get the authenticator code. This is generated when you log into the router interface and can be found highlighted below, and will begin with n=, followed by a random string of numbers, in this case mine was 82177

To change the default gateway address to 192.168.1.1, use the address below and paste it into the browser, changing the n= value at the end to the one we noted down earlier

http://192.168.0.1/snmpSet?oid=1.3.6.1.4.1.4115.1.20.1.1.2.2.1.5.200=%24c0a80101;4;&_n=0

Best Hex to IP Converter / Translator (codebeautify.org)

likewise if you wanted to change it to 192.168.0.2 instead

http://192.168.0.1/snmpSet?oid=1.3.6.1.4.1.4115.1.20.1.1.2.2.1.5.200=%24C0A80001;4;&_n=0

To save and apply the settings, again amend the n= number

http://192.168.0.1/snmpSet?oid=1.3.6.1.4.1.4115.1.20.1.1.9.0=1;2;&_n=0

The Superhub should shortly reboot itself after. If not, check the commands have been issued correctly, especially the last one since that applies the settings.

Does it work well?

Almost, there are a few issues with the router being in this setup.

One of which is the constantly flashing green light at the front of the hub. This is due to the router attempting to find a DOCSIS signal, even though it is technically connected to the internet, the cable modem side of things is still trying to connect via its coax connection. There’s no option to disable this so I’d advise to just tape over the light, since its never going to find a DOCSSIS signal.

Firmware updates for the Superhub are delivered via the cable network only, and the Superhub has to be authorised at the headend in order to receive the update. This means you will be stuck with t he same software currently on the router. Whilst this isn’t a huge issue, since the Superhub firmware is relatively stable, with the main issue being on the cable side of things which we are no longer using.

Further Information

Re: Superhub 3 internal network address – Virgin Media Community

Original Process used to change the default gateway address on a superhub 3.

10 thoughts on “Reusing a Virgin Media Superhub 3 as a Wifi Extender

  1. Andrew Baker

    Thanks for the guide. Just got my new hub 4 and replaced the SH2 (used as wireless extender and switch) out in my room separate from the main house. Worked like a dream and I’m still able to get the admin interface on the new ip

    Liked by 1 person

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    1. sarjil5511gmailcom

      mate, how did you actually connect two routers? is just put ethernet cable in any port of extension router, I’m confused about that.

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  2. Tim

    Hi, thank you so much for this! I was faffing about for ages trying various ways of getting this to work, but this seems to have done the trick. Annoying that Virgin make it difficult to do this, but hey ho. Amazing stuff, really appreciate the help. Thank you again! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  3. sarjil5511gmailcom

    How do i actually connect my old Virgin media router with my new BT broadband, using Ethernet cable? if so which port should I connect it into?

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  4. Rob

    Thank you so much. I thought for half a day I had made the fatal mistake of fixing something that wasn’t broken. I didn’t know that the superhub 3 did not allow the ip address to be changed like in the superhub 2 settings. The only explanation of a fix is this post. Apart from me being dumb the directions are brilliant and most important it works. Yes the green light flashes. But compared to re pairing countless sonoffs and other automation devices the light is a very small price to pay.
    Thanks for sharing your knowledge. I had my doubts but what a nice surprise when everything connected and back online.
    No black spots in house. Excellent speed and range. 5g all over house offering full 100mbs download speed.
    Anyone doubting this fix. It does 100% work. It’s the only option as far as I can see with out buying more hardware.
    I made mistake if changing to manual dchp on laptop instead of on the network adapter. Perhaps that could be clearer in explanation but its more likely that its my lack of knowledge that caused me to make the error.
    Really happy. Thanks again

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  5. Anthony

    After following the guide it does work as a WiFi extender but I’ve ran into a problem on the fire TV it keeps doing the connection diagnostic every few minutes making the fire TV unusable.

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